WP Garage https://wpgarage.com WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:28:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Easily embed PDFs, Word, and PPT in your WordPress website with Simple Google Docs Viewer plugin https://wpgarage.com/plugins/embed-pdfs-google-docs-plugin/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/embed-pdfs-google-docs-plugin/#respond Sun, 29 Jan 2017 12:31:28 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2749 A while back, some of our clients asked how they can best present a PDF on their website other than…

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A while back, some of our clients asked how they can best present a PDF on their website other than just a link. So we searched for a WordPress plugin that would embed a PDF into a post or a page, but couldn’t find one that was clean-coded and lightweight…so we built our own: Simple Google Docs Viewer

The plugin is easy to use, and you can embed a doc in a WordPress post or page with a simple shortcode. Here’s an example of how a PDF looks when embedded onto a post with the plugin:

Depending on the size of your file, it might take a few seconds for the PDF to appear.

Unfortunately, after publishing the plugin we kind of ignored it for a few years, and only recently realized that it didn’t support sites running with ssl that have https in their URL. Worry not, it is now updated and you can use it on your http and https sites, and it is also now responsive!

You can check out the Simple Google Docs Viewer plugin in the WordPress plugin repository.

 

This post was originally published at Easily embed PDFs, Word, and PPT in your WordPress website with Simple Google Docs Viewer plugin on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Should you build your website on WordPress or Wix? https://wpgarage.com/news-views/wix-vs-wordpress/ https://wpgarage.com/news-views/wix-vs-wordpress/#respond Mon, 05 Dec 2016 10:40:59 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2564 WordPress vs. Wix: which is best for your website

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about Wix, WordPress, the Open Source GPL license, marketing and PR. Because…

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WordPress vs. Wix: which is best for your website

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about Wix, WordPress, the Open Source GPL license, marketing and PR. Because I came out strongly in favor of Matt Mullenweg’s position regarding GPL on that post, many may have deduced that I think WordPress is the best website platform and always the best choice.

I don’t.

In fact, when clients approach us about building their websites, I often tell them that we-and-WordPress are not the right choice for them, and they should consider using a hosted site builder like Wix, Weebly or Squarespace.

There are essentially three issues I look at to determine whether a site should be built on WordPress (the WordPress.org self-hosted version, as opposed to WordPress.com. Read WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org to better understand the differences between the platforms) or Wix:

What is your budget?

Budget is the number one consideration when building a website. Building and maintaining a WordPress site can be expensive. Yes, you can find freelancers that will build sites for $500, but if you want your site to be built with strategic goals in mind, and want professionals on the other end who can guide the planning process and develop a fast, secure, and optimized site, the price can get steep. And it doesn’t end there. WordPress sites need tender loving care on an ongoing basis: they need to be updated, bugs pop up that need to be fixed, you may need technical support to help you best manage your site, and since WordPress sites are hot targets for hackers, you need professionals to help you make sure you don’t get hacked. That’s why we at illuminea offer our ongoing WordPress maintenance and support package, and while we give value for the cost, it’s definitely not for everyone.

Also, managing a WordPress site is a learning curve. Many people need professionals to guide them on managing their WordPress sites, which ends up adding to costs. Wix’s drag and drop interface can be much more user-friendly for many people.

Using a hosted service like Wix avoids the above-mentioned costs. If your site is simple and you won’t be updating the content often, Wix may be for you. With Wix you can plan your site yourself, use one of their templates and easily customize as needed, add your content, and launch. I highly recommend that if you do use Wix, you upgrade and get their domain mapping service so your site sits on your own custom domain which looks much more professional than something.wix.com. (But don’t buy your domain name from them! Keep it separate and buy it from a separate domain registrar. Also, don’t use their email service. But I digress…) Even that upgrade is cheap compared to the costs involved in hosting and maintaining your own site on your own server space.

How serious is your online marketing and SEO?

Many sites just need to exist so that if someone comes across a link to the site, whether on printed material like a business card, or in an online directory, there’s a site on the other end. These sites are like an online brochure, and for many purposes that’s totally fine. In these cases, Wix can be a really good solution.

But if you’re an organization that has long term online marketing and lead generation goals, WordPress is probably the better solution for you. For example, many of our clients at illuminea are B2B, and therefore make extensive use of lead generation forms that integrate with third-party business solutions like HubSpot, Marketo, Act-On and Salesforce. Since Wix is a hosted solution, you don’t have access to your site’s codebase which means that adding these integrations is extremely difficult, or impossible. Yes, they offer a variety of apps that you can install on your site to add features, but these apps can’t take into consideration every marketing scenario. Many of them also cost, so that can add up. With a self-hosted WordPress site (and capable coders), these mission-critical integrations are possible.

SEO: Wix has a terrible reputation when it comes to search engine optimization (SEO), and for good reason. For years their platform had almost no on-site SEO in place. However, I did a test run of their platform and things have improved dramatically! Their platform now offers:

  • Per page title and meta description control.
  • XML Sitemap (limited to 500 characters).
  • Ability to add meta code to your site’s header to connect to third-party services like Google Search Console.
  • Open Graph (OG) tags for better and more precise sharing on Facebook.
  • Meta keywords. Uch, why, is it 2001 again? But ok, they’re there.
  • Categories and tags – but they only appear in the sidebar, not on posts.

Considering they had almost none of the above features not that long ago, these are impressive improvements. Here’s what Wix still doesn’t have that Yoast’s WordPress SEO plugin (even the free version!) offers:

  • Author pages for multi-author blog or news sites.
  • Google Knowledge graph info.
  • The ability to exclude pages/posts/post formats/authors/etc. from the sitemap.
  • Nofollow, noindex page options
  • Custom images for social media posting
  • Support for SSL – this is becoming increasingly important by the day.
  • rel=canonical tags.
  • The ability to 301 redirect existing pages to other pages

So if your SEO needs are advanced, Wix is not for you. But if you just need a basic site with basic SEO, Wix now addresses those needs.

Does your site have short or long term goals?

Many sites are set up for short term goals, like time-sensitive campaigns, events, or minisites. As long as there is little need for business tool integrations like those I mentioned above, then Wix can be a great option for these sites.

However, if your goal is to build up long-term authority on your site, you will eventually find yourself hitting a wall in terms of Wix’s capabilities. We’ve seen that with many clients who have come to us after starting out with Wix. This is a really serious issue because Wix does not offer tools for migrating away from their platform:

Specifically, it is not possible to export or embed files, pages or sites, created using the Wix Editor or ADI, to another external destination or host.
– Wix help documentation

This is classic vendor-lock-in, which should be avoided at all costs. WordPress, on the other hand, offers excellent tools for both exporting and importing content.

There are workarounds, like the CMS2CMS plugin that imports your Wix content to WordPress and saves you the pain of copying and pasting everything;  or the option to import the Wix RSS feed to WordPress (but the Wix feed is limited to 500 characters and doesn’t include images, so if your site has a lot of content and images, you’ll still end up having to import those manually). There are paid services that will do the export/import for you, like Wix to WordPress:

Wix to WordPress service

Also, if you start with Wix and then decide to migrate your website to any other platform, WordPress or otherwise, you cannot redirect your site’s URLs or authority to the new platform easily. That means that any search equity or authority you built up on Wix is lost. Keep this in mind before you start building up a serious site there: it is almost guaranteed that your needs will outgrow what Wix offers, and then all your hard work is essentially lost.

Another issue is the inability to backup your site. I’m sure that Wix’s servers are very secure and stable, but no servers are 100% safe. If you are writing posts on a regular basis and have created many pages of content, those should be backed up off the server…and yet they can’t be. That is really scary.

Bottom line: like everything, it depends on your needs

Like so many things, the platform you choose for your website depends on your needs. I hope the above can help you make an informed and educated decision.

And if you need any more information about either platform, there are plenty of resources out there. WordPress has a plethora of blogs written by users to help the community, along with the very useful Codex.

Wix also has a Help Center, and their blogwhich is built on WordPress. I guess they decided to choose the best platform for their needs 🙂

Wix built their blog on WordPress

Where Wix and WordPress live in web harmony

This post was originally published at Should you build your website on WordPress or Wix? on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Why Wix’s response to WordPress re GPL license is weak https://wpgarage.com/news-views/weak-wix-response-wordpress-gpl/ https://wpgarage.com/news-views/weak-wix-response-wordpress-gpl/#comments Sun, 30 Oct 2016 08:30:59 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2539 Wix WordPress GPL issue

Over the weekend, WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg called out Wix for using some of WordPress’ Open Source, GPL-licensed code in…

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Wix WordPress GPL issue

Wix WordPress GPL issue

Over the weekend, WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg called out Wix for using some of WordPress’ Open Source, GPL-licensed code in an improper fashion in their new mobile app; and also for ripping off the WordPress brand by calling Wix “WixPress.”

Here’s Wix CEO Avishai Abrahami’s response, and here’s why it’s problematic:

Wix should have provided GPL attribution

Matt said Wix should have provided proper attribution to WordPress for the code used in the mobile app. Abrahami does not address this. Yes, Wix has released over 200 Open Source projects on Github, but doing a good thing doesn’t reconcile doing a not-good thing. If the license says they need to provide attribution, they should address that specific issue for this specific piece of software.

GPL means public release of software

Matt states that if a piece of software includes any components from other GPL software, that makes the whole new piece of software GPL and it should therefore be made public if distributed (which the mobile app was). This is indeed the case, and it is not addressed in Abrahami’s response. Releasing partial components on Github is not enough.

Wix WAS called Wixpress in the past

Matt refers to Wix having ripped off WordPress’ brand by calling themselves Wixpress. I did a quick Google search for “Wixpress Ltd.” and lo and behold, Wix started out as Wixpress. Press releases were filed under the Wixpress name, and the official company name listed in the filing on  the stock exchange is Wixpress Ltd. It is noted in the document that they changed their business name in the US (and after checking the Israeli business registry, it was also changed here), and are now called Wix.com Ltd. Their Brazilian subsidiary is still referred to as Wixpress in the filing. None of us know them as Wixpress, so they seem to have smartly shifted away from that brand early on. In fact, while they initially filed for a trademark for this name, they abandoned it in 2010 which indicates they weren’t invested in that name. But the bottom line is, Wixpress is part of their legacy. Why did Abrahami deny that when we all know how to use Google? A more straightforward response would have been “Yeah, in the beginning we made a mistake with our brand, and if you ask anyone what Wixpress is, they probably won’t know since we abandoned that early on in favor of Wix.com”

The tone of Wix’s response is…unsettling

There’s something about Abrahami’s tone in his email that irks me.

Maybe it’s how he calls Matt “dude” and says “I didn’t know we were fighting”. You’re not fighting so don’t make it into a fight: Matt wants you to do what he thinks is right.

Maybe it’s how he tries to deflect accusations of brand-stealing by saying that WordPress has shifted from being only about blogs to being about websites too – I mean, what? Is he saying that Wix has sole ownership of the website-building space and Automattic stole that from them? A company is allowed to expand its focus for goodness sake.

Maybe it’s how he invites Matt to coffee, which is a poor reading of a serious situation. If you think someone ripped off your stuff, you may not feel like getting together with them for coffee…probably more like a court of law.

Also, why didn’t he link to Matt’s original post?! That’s a rhetorical question, but it looks shady. I think it would have been better for the company to have publicized the response by the engineer responsible for the mobile app that Abrahami links to in his post. It addresses the issues in a less…um…passive-aggressive dude-filled way and he shows how he tried to collaborate and share with Automattic’s engineering team. It still doesn’t provide satisfactory answers to the issues at hand, but it’s easier to digest.

Bottom line: lessons to be learned

  1. If you are a commercial company, think a bajillion times before using Open Source code in your proprietary software. Licensing is not only an ethical issue, but can also cause problems down the line if unreported and discovered during due diligence. Here’s a good article on this subject:
    https://twitter.com/stratticweb/status/790832690287087616. It also seems that the Apple Store does not allow GPL code-based apps since the app store’s protections negate the GPL license. So yikes.
  2. Don’t respond to issues immediately, and especially not over the weekend. Matt posted on Friday, and Abrahami posted on Saturday. People are taking a break over the weekend, there’s no rush! It seems that Abrahami wrote in the heat of the moment. He probably should have first had his legal team review the situation, and if necessary, apologize, remove the app from the app store, remove the GPL code and re-release it; OR keep the GPL code, add attribution, and publicly distribute it. In general, your legal/PR/marketing team isn’t working at full capacity on Saturday/Shabbat, so wait until they get to work, review the issues calmly, and then respond. No one’s going anywhere.
  3. Make sure you have people on your team who understand the nuances of other cultures. What’s interesting is that many of my Israeli Facebook hi-tech friends are commending Abrahami on his post. As a grew-up-in-Canada person, I’m cringing when I read it, and I’m not the only one. If you are a non-American company, make sure you have an Anglo on your PR team who has a better grasp of what kinds of tones and intonations work well outside of Israel. We Israelis have a very direct way of communicating, and while that can be great at times, it’s definitely not always great.

Look, Matt’s approach to GPL can come across as zealous. And the GPL has never been tried in an American court of law, so it’s not clear that Matt is right about everything in this case (or other cases). And it’s also possible that Wix made an innocent mistake. Open Source licensing can be confusing and unclear. I’m sure there’s a way to resolve this quickly and painlessly. In the future though, all hi-tech companies should strive to increase awareness of what Open Source means, have decent legal counsel, and a good PR team that reacts thoughtfully to branding and legal crises.

This post was originally published at Why Wix’s response to WordPress re GPL license is weak on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Integrating Gravity Forms with Salesforce and saving parameters from Google Analytics and Adwords https://wpgarage.com/plugins/integrating-gravity-forms-salesforce-saving-parameters-google-analytics-adwords/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/integrating-gravity-forms-salesforce-saving-parameters-google-analytics-adwords/#respond Mon, 13 Jun 2016 07:20:03 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2465 Our love for Gravity Forms(aff) continues. Yes it costs money. And yes, its worth it. This time it’s because of…

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Our love for Gravity Forms(aff) continues. Yes it costs money. And yes, its worth it. This time it’s because of how we integrated Gravity Forms with Salesforce.

Goal: Capture leads from the website, including the Adwords and Google Analytics parameters, and pass them to Salesforce.

Plugins  you’ll need:

  1. Install Gravity Forms.
  2. Install the Gravity Forms for Salesforce Addon Plugin. This is not an official Gravity Forms plugin, and doesn’t have much support, and isn’t actively updated, but… it works, at least for now.
  3. Install the Gravity Forms Prepopulate plugin. Also, not an official Gravity Forms plugin, but it’s so simple and works beautifully.

Step 1: Company field is required by Salesforce

Salesforce requires the company field but we didn’t want our form to require it so we used this code in functions.php:

<?php add_action( 'gform_pre_submission', 'pre_submission_handler' );
function pre_submission_handler( $form ) {
if ( ! rgpost( 'input_3' ) ) {
$_POST['input_3'] = 'Company Not Filled Out';
}
}

 

Step 2: Create hidden fields in Gravity Forms to capture the Google Adwords (GCLID) and Google Analytics (utm_campaign, etc) parameters 

Create hidden fields in Gravity Forms for each parameter you need, such as: utm_source,utm_campaign,utm_medium,utm_term,utm_content, and gclid.

Click on the Advanced tab, and check the box for “Allow field to be populated dynamically”.
Add the parameter name.

gclidgamedium

 

Step 3: Save parameter values in a cookie so they can be passed to Salesforce

The hidden field works great if someone goes to a direct link with all the parameters and fills in a form.
Ex.
http://test.com/?utm_source=testcampaign&utm_medium=testmedium&utm_term=testterm&utm_content=testcontent&utm_campaign=testcampaign

But if a user goes to another page on the site and then comes back and fills in the form, then we’ve lost all the data.

Therefore, we need to save the parameters with a cookie. That’s where the fabulous Gravity Forms Populate plugin comes into play. Go to the plugin settings and enter the parameters.

gfpopulate

 

Step 4: Pass lead info to Salesforce

Now that we have all the info to send, we need to set up the Salesforce plugin and pass the lead info to Salesforce.

Make sure to use the API and not the Web to Lead. Web to Lead didn’t work with custom fields.

salesforceapi

Connect the plugin to your Salesforce Account

salesforceconnect

Go to Forms > Salesforce and click Add New

addnewsalesforce

Select what Object you want to use. We used Lead.
Select the form to integrate with.

salesforceobject

Map your form fields to your Salesforce fields

salesforcemapping

Step 4: Test all the things

You can use the Google link builder to get a test url with all the parameters. (You can learn more about the link builder here)

Click on the test url (ex. http://test.com/?utm_source=testcampaign&utm_medium=testmedium&utm_term=testterm&utm_content=testcontent&utm_campaign=testcampaign)

See if your parameter values are getting stored in a cookie with the Resources tab in the Chrome console
cookies
Fill out the form and check in Salesforce to see if the info is there!

Good luck!

This post was originally published at Integrating Gravity Forms with Salesforce and saving parameters from Google Analytics and Adwords on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Pagination not working on category archives using WPML [and solution] https://wpgarage.com/plugins/pagination-not-working-category-archives-using-wpml/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/pagination-not-working-category-archives-using-wpml/#respond Wed, 08 Jun 2016 10:39:58 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2467 One of our sites has the permalinks set up with: /%category%/%postname%/ This worked fine when the site was in English. But…

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One of our sites has the permalinks set up with: /%category%/%postname%/

This worked fine when the site was in English. But then we had to create a Hebrew mirror site and used WPML(aff), which we have a love/hate relationship with.

And then we noticed that the pagination on category archives wasn’t working properly on the Hebrew (secondary) site. When you’d navigate to mywebsite.com/mycategory/page/2 the page said “Sorry, not found”. Not great.

After some searching, I found the No Category Base plugin built for WPML.

And voila! that almost solved the problem. Pagination was working again.

BUT.

Every time there was a plugin or WordPress upgrade, most of the links on the site broke.

We’d see a browser error that said: “oursite.com page isn’t working.  oursite.com redirected you too many times.”

After re-saving the permalink structure, the site would work again, but this didn’t seem like a very good solution, to say the least.

Turns out that there’s a conflict with the Yoast WordPress SEO plugin which we love. In the Yoast plugin under Advanced Settings > Permalinks , the Change URLs needs to be “Keep”, since removing the category base is handled by the No Category Base plugin.

yoastsettings

 

Hope this helps someone 🙂

This post was originally published at Pagination not working on category archives using WPML [and solution] on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Solution to WooCommerce error: Sorry, no products matched your selection. Please choose a different combination. https://wpgarage.com/plugins/solution-to-woocommerce-error-sorry-no-products-matched-your-selection-please-choose-a-different-combination/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/solution-to-woocommerce-error-sorry-no-products-matched-your-selection-please-choose-a-different-combination/#comments Wed, 30 Sep 2015 12:33:10 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2425

In one of our clients’ sites using WooCommerce, we got a popup message saying: Sorry, no products matched your selection. Please choose…

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woocommerce
In one of our clients’ sites using WooCommerce, we got a popup message saying:
Sorry, no products matched your selection. Please choose a different combination. 
sorry2
Even once we closed the error box, I couldn’t select one of the variations on a product. Argh!
I tried many suggestions I found online such as setting the default variation value and enabling ‘manage stock’ on a variation basis. When nothing worked, I thought I would have to painfully go through each of the WooCommerce template files in our theme and update each one. But then I took one last stab at it by adding a new product from scratch. And it worked!

The Problem

The problem had to do with how attributes were previously set up in WooCommerce.
For  a variable product, in the product’s attributes, the values for the Size attribute were set to: S | M | L | XL | 8 | 10 | 12 | 14 | 16  written out with separators.
separator

The Solution

  1. Edit a Variable Product
  2. Go to Attributes, and remove the existing values remove1
  3. Add the attribute again (ex. Size) and click Select Allselect1
  4. Click Save Attributes (this is important for the next step)
  5. Go to Variations, and set the default size and re-assign each of the variations (the variations are probably still there but you need to re-map them).map1

And then, voila! No more error message!

It worked for us and I hope it works for you too!

This post was originally published at Solution to WooCommerce error: Sorry, no products matched your selection. Please choose a different combination. on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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WordPress default themes should serve as a role model for all themes https://wpgarage.com/news-views/wordpress-default-themes-should-serve-as-a-role-model-for-all-themes/ https://wpgarage.com/news-views/wordpress-default-themes-should-serve-as-a-role-model-for-all-themes/#comments Thu, 03 Sep 2015 07:23:56 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2418 WordPress Twenty Sixteen Default Theme

With the upcoming release of the new WordPress default theme, Twenty Sixteen, many in the WordPress community are discussing this particular…

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This post was originally published at WordPress default themes should serve as a role model for all themes on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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WordPress Twenty Sixteen Default Theme

With the upcoming release of the new WordPress default theme, Twenty Sixteen, many in the WordPress community are discussing this particular theme in particular, and default themes in general.  For example, WordPress committer Aaron Jorbin brings up a number of important points regarding the WordPress default theme, including that it serves as a non-threatening way for people to contribute to WordPress, whether SaSS should be used in WordPress default themes, and makes the argument that it should not be used. (I agree.)

Jeff Chandler and I discussed Twenty Sixteen during last week’s WP Weekly podcast, and I told him what I tell anyone who will listen to me:

WordPress default themes should serve as an example of best practices for theme development and as a learning tool for new users.

Here’s what I mean:

There’s a general structure for 90% of websites on the web: they have a header, navigation, maybe another minor navigation, sidebar, main content, and footer. They’ll have a blog/news section, with a list of posts, and individual post pages. A good site is well built semantically, is responsive, and accessible. A solid WordPress default theme would cover  that ground in a way that guides both new and experienced users in how to build a great theme. It could even serve as the jumping off point for new themes which would use the default theme as the parent. The ultimate parent theme.

But most important to me is that it should be a learning tool. I learned to build WordPress themes by first taking the Kubrick theme and modifying it, then modifying it more, and then even further. It was a solid theme with the layout needed for most sites, and was (at least I thought then) well coded and showed me how to use WordPress template tags properly.

For me, the default theme is less about me and the “older” generation of WordPress users. It’s about helping those who want to learn WordPress.

My two cents.

This post was originally published at WordPress default themes should serve as a role model for all themes on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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View a site on a new server without modifying your hosts file with hosts.cx! https://wpgarage.com/tips/view-a-site-on-a-new-server-without-modifying-your-hosts-file-with-hosts-cx/ https://wpgarage.com/tips/view-a-site-on-a-new-server-without-modifying-your-hosts-file-with-hosts-cx/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 08:40:04 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2404 hosts.cx logo

Many years ago, my life changed when I learned about the hosts file. For those not familiar with the hosts…

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hosts.cx logo

Many years ago, my life changed when I learned about the hosts file. For those not familiar with the hosts file, it’s a file on your computer that you can modify to allow you to view a website on a server that hasn’t had the domain name pointed at it yet. This is a great trick for previewing sites, but has its drawbacks. For one, you can’t easily show clients their sites prior to pointing the domain. Second, it’s a pain in the tuches to have to go in and modify the hosts file for every new site, and then to remember to un-modify it. And for some reason, modifying my hosts file doesn’t work for me anymore.

Well, viewing un-launched sites just became a zillion times easier thanks to a new tool discovered by one of our Project Managers, Alon Katziri, called The Website Previewer. Just enter the IP address of the server where the new site is sitting, and enter the domain name that will point to the site, and click Get My Testing URL.

Get Testing URL from hosts.cx

This takes you to a handy page with a link to your temporary site for viewing, and a handy QR code you can point and click at from your mobile phone to preview the mobile version of your site too. They thought of everything!

hosts.cx temporary URL

We love you hosts.cx.

Update June 26, 2016

Here’s another tool that lets you view a site without modifying the hosts file: NO DNS I/O

This post was originally published at View a site on a new server without modifying your hosts file with hosts.cx! on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Gravity Forms Tip: How to Add a PayPal Transaction ID to notifications on a WordPress site https://wpgarage.com/plugins/gravity-forms-tip-how-to-add-a-paypal-transaction-id-to-notifications-on-a-wordpress-site/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/gravity-forms-tip-how-to-add-a-paypal-transaction-id-to-notifications-on-a-wordpress-site/#respond Wed, 29 Apr 2015 15:37:05 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2240 Gravity Forms is by far my favorite forms plugin for WordPress – with all the great extensions, like PayPal and Mailchimp,…

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This post was originally published at Gravity Forms Tip: How to Add a PayPal Transaction ID to notifications on a WordPress site on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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Gravity Forms is by far my favorite forms plugin for WordPress – with all the great extensions, like PayPal and Mailchimp, and the ease of use for clients.

So, if you’re using Gravity Forms (aff) in conjunction with the PayPal Addon to get donations or to sell individual products, you may need to send the PayPal Transaction ID to your customer or keep it for your own records.

Here’s how:

In your functions.php add the following:

add_filter( 'gform_replace_merge_tags', 'replace_transaction_id', 10, 7 );
function replace_transaction_id( $text, $form, $entry, $url_encode, $esc_html, $nl2br, $format ) {
$transaction_id = empty( $transaction_id ) ? rgar( $entry, 'transaction_id' ) : $transaction_id;
$text = str_replace( '{transaction_id}', $transaction_id, $text );
return $text;
}

In the Notifications (Under Form Settings > Notifications), use the merge tag {transaction_id}.transactionid

That’s it!

This post was originally published at Gravity Forms Tip: How to Add a PayPal Transaction ID to notifications on a WordPress site on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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I’m impressed with blogVault’s support https://wpgarage.com/plugins/blogvault-support/ https://wpgarage.com/plugins/blogvault-support/#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 09:42:40 +0000 https://wpgarage.com/?p=2236 And my love for blogVault continues…. Recently, I wrote a post about how we’re using blogVault(aff) to migrate, restore, and backup our…

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This post was originally published at I’m impressed with blogVault’s support on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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blogvaultlogo

And my love for blogVault continues….

Recently, I wrote a post about how we’re using blogVault(aff) to migrate, restore, and backup our websites.

I also included some honest feedback about some things that are lacking and things that could be improved such as better integration with Dropbox and a better user interface on their website.

Soon after I wrote that post, I noticed an error on all our sites: “The plugin blogvault/blogvault.php has been deactivated due to an error: Plugin file does not exist.”

I contacted blogVault via their contact form on their website to find out what the problem was.

Two seconds later, they saw that I was logged into the blogVault Dashboard and started chatting with me. A little stalker-ish, but in a good way. They helped me figure out that the problem was related to automatic updates in InfiiteWP(IWP), a platform we use for upgrading multiple WordPress sites.

They emailed me a few days later saying the problem connected to IWP was fixed! I was able to re-activate all the plugins with one click in IWP, and everything went back to normal.

And, while we were chatting, the blogVault support staff mentioned that he saw our post about our feature requests via Twitter and wanted to respond to all of them!

I was blown away. They are so on the ball with taking their customers seriously and responding to them so personally.

Here are the takeaways from our chat:

blogVault Plugin for WordPress

 My Feedback: The plugin that connects a site to blogVault has not really been working for me so I need to add it manually to each site.

blogVault’s Response: We are fixing the auto-install

 

Dashboard Interface

My Feedback: I wish there was a better dashboard for seeing all the sites I’m backing up. Right now, you can either search or scroll, scroll, scroll to see more. I actually love the way IWP displays the list of sites you are managing.

blogVault’s Response: the Dashboard will be revamped in a big way. we are honestly not happy with the current state of the dashboard

 

Better integration with Amazon S3 and Dropbox

 My Feedback: blogVault saves all your backups on their server. I would love to be able to save backups automatically to our own remote server. Right now, only Dropbox is available for these extra backups, and these backups can only be done manually one site at a time. Also, I wish I could select which folder I want the backup to go to in Dropbox. Currently, blogVault decides that it goes into a generic blogVault folder.

blogVault’s Response:  The automatic saving to Dropbox is something which we are not very sure about though.  we could end up filling up the dropbox space in no time we store all the data on our own 2 separate servers further we then backup all the data onto Amazon S3 which is completely independent of our data center. In terms of specifying a folder, we will consider adding that Thanks. I have made a note. Should not be a big feature, so will try and squeeze it in some downtime. Regarding an auto-backup to your own Amazon S3 account, we plan on doing that.

 

Add file sizes in Skipped Files List

My Feedback: It would be really helpful if the skipped files list showed the size of each of the files individually.

blogVault’s Response: We will improve that

 

Delete Error Logs from blogVault Dashboard

My Feedback: Don’t know if it’s possible, but would be cool if there was a way to delete error logs and other skipped files directly from the blogVault dashboard.

blogVault’s Response: We cannot delete the log files etc because we don’t want to add the ability to modify the site in any way from blogVault that way backups will be completely independent of the original site Security wise this is something we would prefer.

 

In conclusion

When I told blogVault that I was impressed with their customer service – how they seem to respond instantly through email and chat, in a real, non-robot-y way, their response was “Thanks,  but we’d rather customers not need support in the first place”. I get it. They’d like to improve their product so that everything works perfectly. But perfection takes a loooong time, and I’d rather use their backup platform, even if it isn’t 100% perfect, because it’s still way better than lots of other tools I’ve used over the years.

 

 

 

 

This post was originally published at I’m impressed with blogVault’s support on WP Garage - WP Garage - WordPress tricks, hacks, and tips.

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